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Blue is Germany’s favourite colour

Photo: e15, Kerman
Photo: e15, Kerman

The Germans love blue. With 19 per cent preferring this colour, it is ahead of green (14%) and red (13%) by a clear margin. The most popular colour spectrum overall runs from beige (10%) and yellow (7%) through to orange (6%). These are the findings of a representative nationwide survey of 1,000 Germans aged between 16 and 75, commissioned by the German Paint Institute in Frankfurt (DLI / Deutsches Lackinstitut).

Design history you can touch

© GAG Köln
© GAG Köln

The Germania housing estate in the Höhenberg district of Cologne, just ten minutes by car from Koelnmesse, is a remarkable architectural achievement in its own right. Built between 1920 and 1928 on the former grounds of the Germania coal mine, some of the architects involved in its planning were amongst the leading names of the time. The result reflects different architectural styles of the Weimar Republic that have come together in a harmonious whole as a work of architecture. Even at the time it was considered exemplary for urban residential building. Weimarer Strasse is also home to another special find: no. 15, Paul-Schwellenbach-Haus. A historic house museum has been set up here to convey the feeling of living in the 1920s.

Veneer: A little slice of nature in an individual design

© IFN/Danzer
© IFN/Danzer

In times of a growing awareness of sustainability, renewable raw materials are more in demand than ever. Of these raw materials, and as a natural product that is very versatile, wood is in the vanguard. In addition to furniture, wood can be used for floor coverings, doors, windows, stairs and even to build entire houses. Or, indeed, for veneer, which is perfectly suitable for surfaces on high-quality furniture, as well as for lamps, car interiors or even for glasses, mouse pads and sports equipment.

Healthy sitting:
The ideal way to furnish your workplace

© Actiu
© Actiu

Whether we’re in the office, behind the wheel or at home in front of the TV – we sit too much and for too long. According to a survey conducted by the German market research institute GfK on behalf of the health insurer DKV and the Sport University Cologne, we spend an average of 450 minutes or 7.5 hours sitting on workdays. General tips such as regularly standing up and getting some exercise are simply not enough. Sitting correctly and ensuring that seating furniture supports correct sitting posture is vital.

Turning old into new:
seat covers made from recycled drinks bottles

© Brunner
© Brunner

Polyethylene terephthalate or PET for short. It is the material used to make drinks bottles. Consumers in Germany can return these bottles to supermarkets after use and collect the refundable deposit. But what happens to the no-longer-needed, crushed bottles? Some of them are made into bottles again, others into T-shirts or fleeces. And some of them are made into seat covers. Brunner uses a cover fabric made from 100% recycled polyester for many of its products.